Hey guys!! Been a while, been a crazzzzy past few months, but am back on track with the blog thing and will be becoming more active again. I’m starting a job at the local University in the next couple of weeks and I’m also hoping to get some research done for my portfolio’s. Maybe even a bit more medical photography, but we’ll see. We never know what this year is going to bring us. As always I’m happy to answer all questions and give info and help if I can. More to come from this blog in coming weeks and months. 2013 don’t stop me now! :) 

LOVE this ;) <3 

jtotheizzoe:

Scientists Use Cells to Fold Origami

Picture a gingerbread house. Without the frosting that glues its walls and windows together, it would be nothing but a disorganized pile of cookies and candy. The “glue” makes it all possible. 

So it is with our bodies. We are a carefully organized cellular panoply of dozens of cell types, from muscle to bone to nerve, but without connective tissue, we’d just be a pile of cellular mush. Much of our cellular glue is created by a type of cell called a “fibroblast”, which secretes a sticky web called the extracellular matrix that those muscle, bone, nerve and other cells use as a sort of structural scaffold. These fibroblasts, as anyone who’s ever seen them under a microscope knows, are known for their spiky, tentacle-like arms, allowing them to move and squeeze into our the nooks and crannies that make up … well, the inside of us.

The fibroblast cells in this video were placed on the hinges of microscopic origami patterns. When their sticky, prehensile arms pull on those hinges, they are able to fold them into 3D shapes, using the same structural goop and scaffolds that hold our bodies together!

Very cool. Let’s see them make a crane.

(via PsiVid)

creepicrawlies:

Willow the white whale swims next to a normal coloured whale off the coast of Spitsbergen, Norway. Dan Fisher was on a boat trip to Svalbard in Norway when he noticed a giant white hump rise from the water. Rushing up a mast to get a better look, he quickly realised he was witnessing one of nature’s rarest sights - a white whale. Its colour is caused by a condition called leucism, caused by a reduction in skin pigment.Picture: Dan Fisher / Barcroft Media

creepicrawlies:

Willow the white whale swims next to a normal coloured whale off the coast of Spitsbergen, Norway. Dan Fisher was on a boat trip to Svalbard in Norway when he noticed a giant white hump rise from the water. Rushing up a mast to get a better look, he quickly realised he was witnessing one of nature’s rarest sights - a white whale. Its colour is caused by a condition called leucism, caused by a reduction in skin pigment.Picture: Dan Fisher / Barcroft Media

(via creepicrawlies)

UWE Students’ Union is committed to improving our work within equality and diversity. We recognise that students at UWE come from diverse backgrounds, different faiths, and different cultures. Every year, we welcome students from over 140 countries worldwide, making UWE very unique for its international and intercultural community.

Our music is living testimony to the fact that cultures can and do mix. It unites us and gives us strength, and offers a vibrant celebration of our multicultural and multiracial society.

Join us for the evening, and enjoy Bristol music talent - and loudly say that racism has no place in our city

Cup of Tea Numero uno

So you guys have probably figured I’m back yes? ;). I’m back blogging regularly now and more updates and news to follow! Recently I’ve sort of finished uni and am now job hunting to start of my career in the world of Biomedicine. I’m resitting an exam on Wednesday - Wish me luck! To improve upon my grade as I was literally half a mark away! Doh! So today I’m revising like mad again reading upon the poster I’ve made and covered the house with, and now back onto CML and Acute and Chronic Leukaemias. 

Updates and more cups of tea to follow. Hope everyone is having a good day!! Ciao! xx

crookedindifference:

Phoenix Mars Lander DVD

This image, released on Memorial Day, May 26, 2008, shows the American flag and a mini-DVD on the Phoenix’s deck, which is about 3 ft. above the Martian surface. The disc, compiled by the Planetary Society, contains Visions of Mars, a multimedia collection of literature and art about the Red Planet. Works include the text of H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds (and the radio broadcast by Orson Welles), Percival Lowell’s Mars as the Abode of Life with a map of his proposed canals, Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles, and Kim Stanley Robinson’s Green Mars. There are also messages directly addressed to future Martian visitors or settlers from, among others, Carl Sagan and Arthur C. Clarke. In 2006, The Planetary Society collected a quarter million names submitted through the Internet and placed them on the disc, which claims, on the front, to be “the first library on Mars.” This Phoenix DVD is similar to the Voyager Golden Record that was sent on the Voyager 1 &amp; 2 missions.
The Phoenix DVD is made of a special silica glass designed to withstand the Martian environment, lasting for hundreds (if not thousands) of years on the surface while it awaits discoverers.
The text just below the center of the disk reads:
This archive, provided to the NASA Phoenix mission by The Planetary Society, contains literature and art (Visions of Mars), greetings from Mars visionaries of our day, and names of 21st century Earthlings who wanted to send their names to Mars. This DVD-ROM is designed to be read on personal computers in 2007. Information is stored in a spiral groove on the disc. A laser beam can scan the groove when metallized or a microscope can be used. Very small bumps and holes represent the zeroes and ones of digital information. The groove is about 0.74 micrometres wide. For more information refer to the standards document ECMA-268 (80 mm DVD Read-Only Disk).
The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

crookedindifference:

Phoenix Mars Lander DVD

This image, released on Memorial Day, May 26, 2008, shows the American flag and a mini-DVD on the Phoenix’s deck, which is about 3 ft. above the Martian surface. The disc, compiled by the Planetary Society, contains Visions of Mars, a multimedia collection of literature and art about the Red Planet. Works include the text of H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds (and the radio broadcast by Orson Welles), Percival Lowell’s Mars as the Abode of Life with a map of his proposed canals, Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles, and Kim Stanley Robinson’s Green Mars. There are also messages directly addressed to future Martian visitors or settlers from, among others, Carl Sagan and Arthur C. Clarke. In 2006, The Planetary Society collected a quarter million names submitted through the Internet and placed them on the disc, which claims, on the front, to be “the first library on Mars.” This Phoenix DVD is similar to the Voyager Golden Record that was sent on the Voyager 1 & 2 missions.

The Phoenix DVD is made of a special silica glass designed to withstand the Martian environment, lasting for hundreds (if not thousands) of years on the surface while it awaits discoverers.

The text just below the center of the disk reads:

This archive, provided to the NASA Phoenix mission by The Planetary Society, contains literature and art (Visions of Mars), greetings from Mars visionaries of our day, and names of 21st century Earthlings who wanted to send their names to Mars. This DVD-ROM is designed to be read on personal computers in 2007. Information is stored in a spiral groove on the disc. A laser beam can scan the groove when metallized or a microscope can be used. Very small bumps and holes represent the zeroes and ones of digital information. The groove is about 0.74 micrometres wide. For more information refer to the standards document ECMA-268 (80 mm DVD Read-Only Disk).
The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

(via crookedindifference)

"People associate mental disorder with violence. We found that crime and mental disorder are linked, but not in the way people think: Persons with severe mental disorders are terribly vulnerable to victimization."

Linda Teplin, discussing her research paper ‘Crime victimization in adults with severe mental illness’ (This paper is under paid access, but free articles summarizing it can be read here and here)

So this is the 2150th note on this quote that I posted a few weeks ago. Glad that this sentiment is resonating. You’re all great (unless you commented on it to dispute it and claim that all mentally ill folks are violent: y’all can go suck an egg)

(Source: hellosugarmouse, via hellosugarmouse)

In 30 minutes, your body gives off enough heat to bring half a gallon of water to boil.

(Source: avoiding-thefreshman15)

jimmysketchbook:

Sketchbook page from a while back… Just a quick anatomy study, here I was referencing some work by Stephen Rogers Peck.

jimmysketchbook:

Sketchbook page from a while back… Just a quick anatomy study, here I was referencing some work by Stephen Rogers Peck.

(via scientificillustration)

rhamphotheca:

Water Flea (Daphnia sp.)
photo by Joan Röhl, Institute for Biochemistry and Biology Potsdam, Germany
(via: Live Science)

rhamphotheca:

Water Flea (Daphnia sp.)

photo by Joan Röhl, Institute for Biochemistry and Biology Potsdam, Germany

(via: Live Science)

(via buggirl)

drannachacko:

With significant expertise in the areas of imaging and radiology, Dr. Anna Chacko dedicates herself to improving systems and imaging techniques for the medical profession. Especially committed to the cause of patient care for veterans of the United States military, she undertakes continuing…

(via scientificillustration)

kristinmountillustration:

I do a lot of weird little textbook illustrations. This was one in a series showing the blood clotting process in a laceration. I think it was for an immunology book. I used Adobe Illustrator only because it had to be entirely vector. It was sort of a challenge, because I was limited to a very narrow palette. When friends and relatives ask me if I have any work they can hang in their house, I’m never sure what to tell them. I’m trying to picture this hanging over someone’s sofa.

kristinmountillustration:

I do a lot of weird little textbook illustrations. This was one in a series showing the blood clotting process in a laceration. I think it was for an immunology book. I used Adobe Illustrator only because it had to be entirely vector. It was sort of a challenge, because I was limited to a very narrow palette. When friends and relatives ask me if I have any work they can hang in their house, I’m never sure what to tell them. I’m trying to picture this hanging over someone’s sofa.

(via scientificillustration)

thesilentalarm said: That question asking if you make money is a fake trying to get you to join the site, I have been asked the same question as well as loads of people

I thought it was as well. Only clicked after i sent it. I’m such a muppet haha :) Luckily I didn’t join the site :) 

scipsy:

Cancer and Mice by Robin Davies

The image depicts the skeleton of a mature mouse fetus. Staining allows researchers to see both mineralized bone (red) and cartilage (blue), and to examine the skeleton for structural abnormalities. This mouse is part of a study evaluating whether new anti-cancer compounds cause any undesirable affects in developing embryos or fetuses.
via  Cool Science Image Contest 2012

scipsy:

Cancer and Mice by Robin Davies

The image depicts the skeleton of a mature mouse fetus. Staining allows researchers to see both mineralized bone (red) and cartilage (blue), and to examine the skeleton for structural abnormalities. This mouse is part of a study evaluating whether new anti-cancer compounds cause any undesirable affects in developing embryos or fetuses.

via Cool Science Image Contest 2012

jtotheizzoe:

Five Questions on H5N1
The second of two controversial papers regarding H5N1 flu studies has been published. This tiny virus is quite the head-scratcher. How can something so simple, with only 14,000 bases in its genome, evolve to be so deadly and so hard to detect?
Ed Yong takes a look at five pressing questions about what makes H5N1 so successful and what scientists should do about it.
(via Nature News)

jtotheizzoe:

Five Questions on H5N1

The second of two controversial papers regarding H5N1 flu studies has been published. This tiny virus is quite the head-scratcher. How can something so simple, with only 14,000 bases in its genome, evolve to be so deadly and so hard to detect?

Ed Yong takes a look at five pressing questions about what makes H5N1 so successful and what scientists should do about it.

(via Nature News)